The CVMEA Model

What is it?

The CVMEA model is a model conceptualized by Rashidul Bari which combines all the methods by which a learner can learn a topic or subject. 

How does a CVMEA Modeled Lesson Plan Look Like?

*Note, to view the full program, please go to the Khan Academy Version

Conceptual
Conceptual
The conceptual aspect of the CVMEA model deals with how students can conceptually understand a topic. For example, instead of interveing math into the topic of discussion, one can define gravity very simply and plainly using conceptual physics.
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Visual
The visual aspect of the CVMEA model deals with how students can visually understand a topic. For example, one can display a 3D model of an animated flower to demonstrate clorophyll, instead to blandely just talking about it.
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Mathematics
The mathematical aspect of the CVMEA model deals with how students can utilize mathematics to better understand a topic. For example, instead of just saying gravity  is the force of attraction between 2 objects,such as Object A & Object B, we can write out the universal law of gravitation to find out the specific a,ount of gravity between the 2 objects.
Experimental
The experimental aspect of the CVMEA model deals with how students can experimentally understand a topic. For example, instead of discussing how magnets which are same charges repel,and opposite attract, we can hand out magnets to students and let them play around with them, until they relize the rules for themselves.
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Algorithmic
The algorithmic aspect of the CVMEA model deals with how students can more efficiently execute what they have currently learned using technology and put their learning to practical & technological use.For example, a student who is quite advanced in Quadratic Equations and knows an adequate amount of programming to produce efficient algorithms, can be given a task by his teacher to produce an algorithm which produces the output of any quadratic equation given 3 variables, a, b, and c, under 0.9 Seconds.
Rashidul Bari